Top 10 Signs You’re Not Ready To Be A Security Tester

Becoming a security tester can be tough. It requires deep training and expertise in system architecture, computer engineering, network theory, and human psychology. Learning these skills can take considerable time, and it may take years for a tester to truly become a security master.

If you are learning to be a security testers, here are 10 signs you’re not quite ready for the job:

10. Your password appears on this list.

9. Your concept of social engineering is to throw a really great party and then figure out how each person can have the best possible time.

8. You think 56 bit DES ought to be good enough for anyone.

7. You can’t remember if your doctor gave you a SQL injection with your last set of vaccinations.

6. You think Van Eck phreaking is the title of Armin Van Buuren’s latest album.

5. You start looking for a mop when you hear someone mention a buffer overflow.

4. You think phishing means getting stoned and going to a concert by that band from Vermont.

3. When you hear OWASP, you reach for a can of bug spray.

2. You think that cross-site scripting is a fancy form of calligraphy.

1. You worry that if the private key doesn’t open up a little more, it will never be accepted by its friends and public_key will always be the popular one.

Essential Guide to Mobile App Testing

Software Engineers: “Forgive Me Testers, For I Have Sinned”

A few days back, GigaOM posted terrific article on the 7 Sins of Software Development. When you read it, which I strongly suggest, I think you’ll see that testers play a huge role in absolving the various “deadly” sins of software engineers.

If you’re too apathetic to read the article (sloth is a sin, FYI) then check out the excerpts below:

Sloth
Sloth is apathy, not laziness. An apathetic programmer is the arguably the most detrimental, because he has zero interest in quality. On the other hand, a lazy programmer can be a good programmer, because laziness can drive long-term efficiencies. For example, if I’m too lazy to type in my password everywhere, I might create a single sign-on feature. Or, if I’m too lazy to manually deploy software, I will instead write an automatic deployment tool. Laziness and scalability go hand in hand.

Wrath
Although many software engineers seem peaceful, underneath the surface often lurks a passive aggressive personality. Take a look at source code comments to see examples of this hidden hostility. Usually profanity in source code is proportional to technical debt. However, it is vital that your engineers are not milquetoasts. Beware of the programmer who does not ask questions or who will use any text editor willingly. Good programmers have strong opinions, but they also appreciate lively debates.

Envy
Envy can be very dangerous in software development. Envy for other products often leads to feature creep. If someone mentions feature parity, you should ask, “But do we need it?” The ultimate killer feature is simplicity, but simple to use is hard to design. Also, it is easy to lose focus when you are constantly watching what other companies are doing. Imagine building towers out of Legos. Would you rather build one tower at a time or many towers in parallel? The parallel approach only works if the towers are identical. Otherwise, you spend too much time context switching. Agility is not the same as half-baked. And doing one thing well is still underappreciated.

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uTesters and Customers Gather at the uMeetup in NYC

uTest uMeetup 360 NYCWe’re excited to share the details of our first ever uMeetup 360 – held in New York City. uMeetups are local networking events organized by top testers and sponsored by uTest. Invitations are extended to all software testers in the local vicinity to meet in person, listen to presentations on special software testing topics and learn more about participating in paid projects with uTest. We created the uMeetup 360 to include not only testers, but customers and uTest employees as well.

Caleb Cohen, a gold uTester helped us organize this latest event where testers and customers alike gathered from the Tri State Area. They enjoyed making introductions, exchanging testing experiences and generally enjoying each other’s company. Meeting at Ayza Wine and Chocolate bar we shared good drinks, amazing cheese,and of course chocolate!

We’ve received some great feedback from testers who have taken part in uMeetups in the past. Being passionate about testing and about uTest seems to be a common thread that brings these testers, and now customers, together. It was really exciting to add customers to the mix and let these different groups share their experiences and network with each other.

Want to have a uMeetup in your area? Check the forums to find the one nearest to you. If you don’t see your country on the list  apply for a sponsorship here. Previous uMeetups have been in Cordoba Argentina, St. Petersburg Russia, Singapore, Mumbai India, Chicago, Shenzhen China and Boston.

 

Essential Guide to Mobile App Testing

8 Tips For Becoming a Dedicated Tester

Become a top software testerOur old friend James Bach recently fielded a question on his blog from a new tester seeking advice on what her daily routine should include so that she can grow in her new field. James seems impressed by the new tester’s discipline (she did willingly ask for daily testing “homework” after all) and dedication to the craft. He outlined five tasks he believes every tester should practice on a daily basis, here’s a quick summary of his tips:

Write every day
Whenever I find myself with a few moments, I make notes of my thoughts about testing and technical life.

Watch yourself think every day
While you are working, notice how you think. Notice where your ideas come from. Try to trace your thoughts.

Question something about how you work every day
Testers question things, of course. That’s what testing is. But too few testers questions how they work. Too few testers question why testing is the way it is.

Explain testing every day
Even if no one makes you explain your methodology, you can explain it to yourself.

I like these tips because they aren’t the typical recommendations you run across, like “test whenever you can,” “read an array of testing books” and “be open-minded when it comes to techniques.” Those are great tips too, just nothing special. Of course, James didn’t just give one sentence explanations for each of his pointers, so take a few minutes and read his complete blog post to get the full impact of these smart tips.

And as a little extra, here are a couple more tips James’ readers left in the comments section.

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Software QA Engineer Tops “Happiest Jobs” List

Super Happy Fun Time!When asked to think about the happiest job in America, does your own job come to mind? What job do you think is the happiest job? When asking this question, did these positions come to mind: Customer Service Representative, Accountant, Bank Teller or even Warehouse Manager?  Well, according to a survey posted on Forbes.com those jobs are listed in the top 20 of “The Happiest Jobs in America.”  The study took nearly a year to compile and coming in at #1 for the Happiest Job in the US is the Software Quality Assurance Engineer!

“Since we tend to spend more waking hours working than doing anything else, our work happiness is a huge factor in our overall happiness,” says CareerBliss’ chief executive, Heidi Golledge.

Well quoted by Heidi Golledge, as this statement is very true.  I spend more time in the office and with my coworkers than I do my own home and family.  So if I work with people who share the same interests as me, as well as enjoy the work I do, work isn’t necessarily work anymore, it becomes more of a second home.

CareerBliss also found that many people appreciate their jobs more in a down economy. “As the job market is improving every day, we see that employees are looking to evaluate if they are happy in their current position and if their company is providing the type of culture they identify with,” Golledge says. “This year will be a very important year for employers as employees look at a possible career or job change to improve their satisfaction at work.”

More than 100,000 workers took part in the survey and rated factors such as workplace happiness and environment, job resources, co-worker relationships and daily tasks on a sale of 1 to 5. In the end, Software Quality Assurance Engineers came out on top.

With an index score of 4.24, software quality assurance engineers said they are more than satisfied with the people they work with and the company they work for. They’re also fairly content with their daily tasks and bosses. …

Golledge says, “In past studies, we have noted that the long hours and intense demands on software engineers’ time caused them to rank as less than happy.  However, we are happy to report that software quality assurance engineers feel rewarded at work, as they are typically the last stop before software goes live and correctly feel that they are an integral part of the job being done at the company.”

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