Update: Battle Of The TV Networks Tops 500 Bugs In First Three Days

Update: We’re roughly 72 hours into our latest Bug Battle, which is comparing and evaluating the top TV networks: ABC, CBS, NBC and FOX.

With just under four days remaining in the week-long competition, we’ve already had more than 400 testers participate and well over 500 bugs reported. This is shaping up to be the most exciting Bug Battle ever, both in terms of the quantity of bugs submitted and the quality of the reports themselves.

Remember, the Bug Battle ends Friday, February 12th at noon ET, and there is nearly $4,000 in prize money at stake. It’s not too late to win the top prize so get started today (remember, it’s the highest quality bugs that matter, not the quantity)!

To join or catch up on Bug Battle discussions, be sure to check out our testers-only forums.

(Bug) Battle of the Network Stars – Starts this Friday

The major networks have been engaged in a decades-long struggle to win the hearts and minds (and eyes) of viewers. Whether it’s news, sports or sitcoms, these battles are now being fought on multiple fronts – including the distribution of their content through their web and mobile applications.

Which brings me to our latest bug-hunting competition. This quarter’s uTest Bug Battle will challenge testers to find bugs on the web AND mobile apps of the four major TV networks: CBS, NBC, ABC and FOX.

The competition gets started this Friday, February 5 at Noon (ET). At that time, testers from our community will be given one week to search these sites for the most compelling bugs, and to report them through our online platform. We’ll be dishing out nearly $4,000 in prize money for categories like Top Tester, Best Bug and Best Survey Feedback. As an added twist, we’re also including prizes for the Best Mobile Bugs.

More details on this Bug Battle – as well the rules, prizes and deadlines – after this commercial break. Just kidding, you can find them in the “Bug Battle” thread in the uTest Forums and we’ll be sharing more details here in the next few days.

So testers, you’ve got a few days to prepare for our most challenging competition to date. Until then, stay tuned.

Building A Testing Team — Do’s & Don’ts

You’ve got the next big idea for a killer web, desktop or mobile app.  It’s gonna change the world.

So what’s on your to-do list?  Well, you need a slick GUI designer to make it look hot, and top-shelf product team to get the features & UX right.  Oh, and you need some ace developers to make your app come to life.  Good, now you’re done, right?  I mean, yeah, you need to test it, but you can do that yourself… or have your developers do it… or maybe the intern… or your beta users.

Think again, says Rex Black over at eWeek.  Despite what you might think, there IS a right way (and a wrong way) to build the testing team you’ll need to launch a high-quality app:

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Apple’s Tablet On The Launching Pad — T Minus 4, 3, 2…

I think I read somewhere that Apple may be announcing something on Wednesday. </sarcasm>

If you’ve been near any media source in the past few weeks, you’ve probably seen the build-up of Apple’s upcoming announcement, which is widely expected to be the launch of their new tablet device.  To watch the drama unfold, check out Wired.com’s complete coverage.

Does anyone have predictions about size, feature set, price point, et al?  Share your thoughts.  Being a software testing shop, we’re particularly interested in what types of apps that will be built for this new category-defining device.  Will there be an entirely new class of apps (and thus, more Apple-related testing)?  Will it work with iPhone apps?  Is it purely a web device?

UPDATE:  Ok, so now that we know more about the iPad (check out Mashable’s iPad coverage… or TechCrunch’s… or AlleyInsider’s), I’m curious to hear what you think — Worth the wait?  Overhyped?  Revolutionary?  Meh?  Weigh in and tell us your take.

A Dissenting Opinion On Testing’s “To Cert Or Not To Cert” Debate

Earlier this week, we published our three-part interview with Michael Bolton.  This was the latest installment in our monthly Testing The Limits series, in which we sit down with luminaries from the worlds of testing, development, crowdsourcing or startup life.  As part of this discussion, we asked Michael for his take on the issue of testing certifications (as we’ve done with Matt Heusser and James Bach in previous months).

In response to what she felt was “cert-bashing,” Charity Stoner of ProtoTest has written a post defending test certifications.  Since we always encourage civil discourse and open-minded debate — and since the purpose of  the Testing The Limits series is to offer up different perspectives from around the world of software — I wanted to shine a light on this post.

What do you think about test certifications?  Do they provide testers with a toolkit that complements their experience and adds real value?  Are they a marketing mechanism that limits what it means to be a professional software tester?  Or is it somewhere in the middle?  I’d love to hear your thoughts.

Testing the Limits with Michael Bolton – Part III

In the third and final part of the Michael Bolton trilogy, we cover advice for new testers, his hypothetical banishment from Software Land, the blogs he reads and more. Did you miss our earlier interviews? Here’s Part I and Part II.

uTest: Hypothetical: You’ve been banished from testing – nay, ALL software-related activities – for the rest of your days. What will you to earn a living?  What hobbies would you pick up to fill the intellectual void?

MB: Who knows?  For fun, I’d keep playing mandolin, probably. Teach, maybe. Write. I’ve worked in theatre stage management, been a book-keeper, tended bar, worked in a comedy club. In high school I worked in mail rooms during the summer. Whatever I’ve picked up in life, it was because something needed to be done and I was there to do it.  If it didn’t seem like much at first, I started to learn about it quickly. When you invest a little bit of effort to figure out your job, you learn how to makes it faster and better and more interesting. It turns into this great feedback loop. Any job can be more fun when you set out to master it.

uTest: Tell our testing community something about you that your most avid readers don’t know.

MB: While walking through the woods on an island near Vancouver recently, I found myself being quiet and brief, which I like from time to time. Practically nobody knows that.

Lots of people probably don’t know how much I’m eager to help people out. All of my work—courses, articles, conference presentations, this interview—comes with lifetime free technical support. Have a question? Just ask. I might not answer right away—supporting the family with paying work takes precedence over supporting the community—but I’ve never knowingly turned anybody down, so if I don’t answer right away, be persistent. James Bach makes the same offer, by the way. We’ve found that it’s a great way not only to help people, but also to explore problems and come up with solutions and learn things that can help our clients.

uTest: If you were talking to a newbie tester, what advice would you give him or her to set their professional journey off on the right foot?  How about for a 10-year veteran tester?

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All Circuits Are Currently Busy — A Look Back 20 Years After AT&T Network Crash

Bug-iversary Alert! Tomorrow is the 20-year anniversary of the “crash” of the AT&T Long Distance Network. On January 15, 1990 faulty software was installed on the AT&T Electronic Switching System (Number 4 ESS): a one-line bug incapacitated the entire system, disabling switches throughout half the network.

Known as one of the most serious telecom bugs in history, more than 75 million calls were not connected during 9 hours, an estimated $60 million loss.

Dennis Burke of California Polytechnic said it best: “The Jan. 1990 incident showed how bugs in self-healing software can bring down healthy systems, and the difficulty of detecting obscure load- and time-dependent defects in software.”

Speaking of “load defects,” AT&T — after signing up to be exclusive U.S. provider of iPhone service — has recently come under fire for the quality of its network coverage. Businessweek‘s top headlines read:

In light of this bug-iversary, I can’t help but wonder if more testing should have been done before AT&T took on the massive data demands of modern 3G smartphones? What do you think?

Announcing The 2009 “uTester of the Year” Awards

Today, we announced the results of our 2009 uTester of the Year Awards. Our community is full of professional testers, which made the judging incredibly tough (I can’t believe how much the bar has been raised for testers over the course of 2009). This awards program, however, was designed to recognize those few testers whose testing skills, attention to detail and consistently excellent performance stood out.

The winners were selected by our community management team and project managers, and were based upon testers’ performance across several hundred test cycles for web, desktop and mobile applications.

Brian Rock from Austin, Texas was named the overall uTester of the Year.  Brian joined uTest early in 2009 and brings 10+ years of software engineering experience to our community. Over the course of the year, Brian earned MVT (Most Valuable Tester) awards on multiple test cycles and also wrote a popular uTest guest blog post, “Software Testers: The Eyes of the Battlefield.”  He consistently reports excellent bugs, communicates with customers extremely well, and is very engaged in uTest projects.  Brian had this to say about his experience with uTest:

“Working with uTest challenges me to learn new applications and to solve new testing problems on different products every week,” said Brian Rock. “This keeps things fresh and exciting, and opens my eyes to see systems holistically and keep my defect localization skills sharp. This is what I enjoy most about working with uTest, and I am honored to be among this elite group of testers.”

The complete list of winners of is available after the jump:
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Testing The Limits — 2009’s Top Posts

Testing The LimitsAfter we re-launched our brand in May, we decided that the uTest blog needed to be more than just uTest employees talking about uTest events, uTest awards and the uTest community (see how repetitive that gets?).

Writing witty, thought-provoking content is really hard.  And we’re pretty lazy, but fortunately we know some extremely smart & funny people.  So we invented the Testing The Limits series, in which we interview leaders from the worlds of testing, software, entrepreneurship and crowdsourcing.

We’re immensely grateful to these talented, busy people, and we have much more planned for the Testing The Limits series in 2010.  But before we flip the calendar, these posts from this year are worth another look:

June: James Whittaker – Author, Professor and Testing Evangelist at Google

July: Rosie Sherry — Founder of the UK-based Software Testing Club

August: Andrew Muns — President of Software Test & Performance

September: Jack Margo — SVP of Internet Operations of Developer Shed

October: Jon Winsor — Author, Crowdsourcing Expert, and Founder of Victors & Spoils

November: Matt Heusser — Software Testing Author, Professor and Testing Manager

December: James Bach — Software Testing Author, Teacher and Speaker

We have some great guests and ideas lined up for 2010, including software execs, QA thought leaders, and famous journalists & authors.  As always, the goal of Testing The Limits will be to inform, to entertain, and above all else, to help our readers get to know these thought leaders who are worth following and listening to.

Have a suggestion for a future Testing The Limits guest?  Drop us a note or tell us in the comments section.

Happy Holidays From uTest

98% of the time, our blog is chocked full of software testing, QA, mobile apps, Agile testing or other startup-related topics.  Today, however, just a quick note of warm holiday wishes.  All of us in the uTest family wish you and yours a peaceful, joyous holiday season!

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