uTest Announces New Software Testing Career Mentoring Program

mentoringACEing your work as a software tester just got a little easier.

uTest is proud to introduce the beta version of A.C.E. (Assisted Continuing Education), a new software testing career mentoring initiative beginning November 1. The program will be available to all members of the uTest Community.

The mentoring program is designed to help software testers build a solid foundation of testing education. By honing these essential skills, participants will be well-equipped to grow their testing careers and strive for professional success on many levels. This will be achieved through participation in various course modules, each geared to the software testing professional at various stages of his or her career.

At the November 1 beta launch of the program, A.C.E. will offer the first two modules of the program, How to find valuable bugs and How to write great bug reports. Testers will have the option of signing up for one (or both) of the course modules.

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New Testing Tool Tutorials at uTest University

There are plenty of options when it comes to choosing your suite of testing tools. Some tools may excel at one specific task, while others perform at an average level for more than one testing task.

A few months ago, we launched the Tool Reviews section of our site to let members of the uTest community rate and review the best testing tools. The community has responded by easily singling out the most popular and highest rated testing tools. logos

Over at uTest University, we’ve recently published new tutorials for some of the most requested tools in order to help testers set up these tools to use for testing. These tutorials are designed to be quick, easy to follow, and to get you up-and-running in no time.

Check My Links is a browser extension developed primarily for web designers, developers and content editors. The extension quickly finds all the links on a web page, and checks each one for you. It highlights which ones are valid and which ones are broken. You can learn how to set up and use Check My Links for testing using this new tutorial.

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Four Reasons Software Testing Will Move Even Further Into the Wild by 2017

apple0132Ever since our inception, uTest and our colleagues within Applause have always been a huge proponent of what we like to call ‘In-the-Wild’ Testing.

Our community is made up of 150,000+ testers in 200 countries around the world, the largest of its kind, and our testers have already stretched the definition of what testing ‘in the wild’ can be, by testing countless customers’ apps on their own devices where they live, work and play.

That ‘play’ part of In-the-Wild testing is primed to take up a much larger slice of testers’ time. While we have already seen a taste of it with emerging technologies gradually being introduced into the mobile app mix, there are four major players primed to go mainstream in just a couple of short years. That means you can expect testers to be spending less time pushing buttons testing on mobile apps in their homes and offices…and more time ‘testing’ by jogging and buying socks. Here’s why.

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Don’t Say That: Five of the Most Disliked Software Testing Terms

When you say that, you just sound like a jerk.YOU_DONT_SAY

Or maybe at least don’t sound like you completely know what you’re talking about. There are many words and phrases used within the software testing realm that have caused much anguish amongst testers, either because the terms are so vastly overused or are grossly inaccurate in how they are used.

In the past on the uTest Blog, we’ve covered software testing buzzwords, but a tester in our community recently took it a step further in our Forums, coming up with terminology that has caused such unrest beyond the normal annoyances of buzzwords. Here are some of the highlights from the discussion, in the words of our testers:

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iOS Log Capture Tool Showdown: iPhone Configuration Utility vs. iTools

When capturing system information critical for bug reports and reproducing bugs in action, iPhone Configuration Utility is often used as the default tool for capturing iOS logs. But is the standaiTools_logo_Realrd the best option out there for testers? VSiphone_config_real1

In this week’s Testing Tool Showdown, we’ve pitted the iPhone Configuration Utility against iTools to see which has garnered more support. The former is by far the standard testers within the uTest Community use for log capture, and has earned a five-star average review in our Tool Reviews. Here’s some of what our users have to say:

  • IPCU is handy for installing apps that iTunes has issues with. The console log alone is also a quick and easy way to got the logs you need.
  • I have used this tool many times when needing to grab a console log and overall I have found it works well
  • Lightweight and useful. Hard to beat.

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A Separation of Testing and Product: Should Testers ‘Care’?

As a developer, it’s easy to care about that new app you’ve just created. Your new “baby” is taking off, being downloaded by millions of users all over hero_test_102011the world — and it’s your brainchild, one that you’ve poured your blood, sweat and tears into.

But for those testing that app — they may want to do a good job in ensuring the app is successful, but do they actually have an emotional stake in the product itself? The answer to that isn’t as clear, and it’s something that was recently discussed in a great uTest Forums discussion.

According to one of our testers, in one experience at their job, it was pretty easy not to care about the product — it was out of necessity:

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Six Ways Testers Can Get in Touch with Their Inner Programmer

This piece was originally posted by our good friends over at SmartBear Software. If you haven’t read it already for some context to this article, check out Part I in this B93X8G / Luminous Keyboardseries, “Don’t Fear the Code: How Basic Coding Can Boost Your Testing Career.”

Michael Larsen will also be joining us for our next Testing the Limits interview, so be sure to stay tuned to the uTest Blog.

Start Small, and Start Local

My first recommendation to anyone who wants to take a bigger step into programming is to “start with the shell.” If you use a PC, you have PowerShell. If you are using Mac or Linux, you have a number of shells to use (I do most of my shell scripting using bash).

The point is, get in and see how you interact with the files and the data on your system that can inform your testing. Accessing files, looking for text patterns, moving things around or performing search and replace operations are things that the shell does exceptionally well.

Learning how to use the various command line options, and “batching commands” together is important. From there, many of the variable, conditional, looping and branching options that more dedicated programming languages use are available in the shell. The biggest benefit to shell programming is that there are many avenues that can be explored, and that a user can do something by many different means. It’s kind of like a Choose Your Own Adventure book!

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Happy Testers Day: How Will You Celebrate?

A sharp-eyed tester in our community has reminded me that it’s Testers Day. No, we didn’t make that up.ladybug-clipart-celebrate

Developers get a lot of the limelight, but it’s about time that testers get their day in the sun, and what better day than September 9 to celebrate that fact!

Wait, so what significance does September 9 have to testers, you say? Well, let’s say we just wouldn’t be using the term “bug” or “debugging” without this date or the influential woman associated with this date.

According to the Computer History Museum, on September 9, 1947, American computer scientist and United States Navy Rear admiral Grace Murray Hopper recorded the first computer bug in history while working on the Harvard Mark II computer. The problem was traced to a moth stuck between a relay in the machine, which Hopper logged in Mark II’s log book with the explanation: “First actual case of bug being found.”

So there you have it, folks. A momentous event deserves celebration and commemoration. How will you celebrate Testers Day? With a cake? By finding a bug in Grace Hopper’s honor? Be sure to let us know in the Comments below. In the meantime, be sure to give your colleague a high-five and wish them a Happy Testers Day.

uTest to Live Tweet, Interview Speakers This Week From CAST 2014 in NYC

2014_CAST_squareAs a proud sponsor of the Association for Software Testing’s 9th Annual conference this week, CAST 2014, uTest will be in New York City through Wednesday covering all of the happenings and keynotes from this major (and now sold-out) testing event.

Beginning Tuesday here on the Blog, uTest will be providing daily video interviews with speakers from some of the conference’s sessions and keynotes as they leave the stage. Additionally, uTest will also be live-tweeting @uTest on Twitter, using the official event hashtag of #CAST2014 throughout the course of the conference’s full days on Tuesday and Wednesday.

This year’s theme is ‘The Art and Science of Testing,’ so conference speakers will share their stories and experiences surrounding software testing, whether bound by rules and laws of science and experimentation, or expressed through creativity, imagination, and artistry. Some of these esteemed speakers include:

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Germany Gears Up for SoCraTes 2014 Conference

The 4th International Software Craftsmanship and Testing (SoCraTes) Conference show kicks off in Soltau, Germany tomorrow and runs until August 10, 2014. What sets the SoCraTes show apart of other testing conferences is the emphasis on it being run using Open Space Technology (OST). OST is a way for hosting conferences that is “focused on a specific and important purpose or task—but beginning without any formal agenda, beyond the overall purpose or theme.”socrates2014

In this case, the event is about the sustainable creation of useful software in a responsible way and is a joint effort of all Softwerkskammer groups. The show includes hands-on coding sessions, sessions focused on discussion, and interactive talks.

You can get an idea of the schedule for this year’s show, as well as read about what happened at last year’s event from Florian Hopf, Samir Talwar, and others.

Follow tweets from this year’s SoCraTes event via their Twitter account @socrates_2014.

Want to know what other events are happening soon? Check out upcoming software testing events like SoCraTes 2014 on the uTest Events Calendar