uTest Announces New Software Testing Career Mentoring Program

mentoringACEing your work as a software tester just got a little easier.

uTest is proud to introduce the beta version of A.C.E. (Assisted Continuing Education), a new software testing career mentoring initiative beginning November 1. The program will be available to all members of the uTest Community.

The mentoring program is designed to help software testers build a solid foundation of testing education. By honing these essential skills, participants will be well-equipped to grow their testing careers and strive for professional success on many levels. This will be achieved through participation in various course modules, each geared to the software testing professional at various stages of his or her career.

At the November 1 beta launch of the program, A.C.E. will offer the first two modules of the program, How to find valuable bugs and How to write great bug reports. Testers will have the option of signing up for one (or both) of the course modules.

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STARWEST 2014 Interview: Qualities Test Managers Seek in Software Testers

Recently at STARWEST, I caught up with professional software testing team lead Richard DeBarba.

Rich gave some great insight into what qualities he looks for in a team member and how attending STARWEST helps him focus on the most optimal training materials and direction for his team. By attending conferences like STARWEST, Rich is able to keep up with recent trends in software testing and learn about progressive new tools or practices.

So what types of testers do team managers like Rich look for? Check out the video below to see what he had to say!

Testing the Limits With Testing ‘Rock Star’ Michael Larsen — Part II

In Part II of our latest Testing the Limits interview with Michael Larsen, Michael talks why test team leads should take a “hands-off” approach, and why testers should be taken oumichaellt of their comfort zones.

Get to know Michael on his blog at TESTHEAD and on Twitter at @mkltesthead. Also check out Part I of our interview, if you already haven’t.

uTest: In a recent post from your blog, you talked about the concept of how silence can be powerful, especially when leading teams. Do you think this there isn’t enough of this on testing teams?

Michael Larsen: I think that we often strive to be efficient in our work, and in our efforts. That often causes us to encourage other testers to do things “our way.” As a senior software tester, I can often convince people to do what I suggest, but that presupposes that I actually know the best way to do something. In truth, I may not.

Also, by handing other testers the procedures they need to do, I may unintentionally be encouraging them to disengage, which is the last thing I want them to do. As a Boy Scout leader, I frequently have to go through this process week after week. I finally realized that I was providing too much information, and what I should be doing is stepping back and letting them try to figure out what they should do.

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Four Reasons Software Testing Will Move Even Further Into the Wild by 2017

apple0132Ever since our inception, uTest and our colleagues within Applause have always been a huge proponent of what we like to call ‘In-the-Wild’ Testing.

Our community is made up of 150,000+ testers in 200 countries around the world, the largest of its kind, and our testers have already stretched the definition of what testing ‘in the wild’ can be, by testing countless customers’ apps on their own devices where they live, work and play.

That ‘play’ part of In-the-Wild testing is primed to take up a much larger slice of testers’ time. While we have already seen a taste of it with emerging technologies gradually being introduced into the mobile app mix, there are four major players primed to go mainstream in just a couple of short years. That means you can expect testers to be spending less time pushing buttons testing on mobile apps in their homes and offices…and more time ‘testing’ by jogging and buying socks. Here’s why.

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Latest Testing in the Pub Podcast: Part II of Software Testing Hiring and Careers

Testing in the PubThe latest Testing in the Pub podcast continues the discussion on what test managers need to look out for when recruiting testers, and what testers need to do when seeking out a new role in the testing industry.

There’s a lot of practical advice in this edition served over pints at the pub — from the perfect resume/CV length (one page is too short!) to a very candid discussion on questions that are pointless when gauging whether someone is the right fit for your testing team.

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STARWEST 2014 Interview: Mind Over Pixels — Quality Starts With the Right Attitude

How important is a tester’s mindset and attitude when it comes to testing?

I sat down with Stephen Vance, one of the STARWEST 2014 speakers, to chat about just that. As an Agile/Lean coach, Stephen is passionate about helping testers understand how to communicate with developers to better integrate into the software development process, and it all starts with the attitude you bring to the table.

Stephen teaches that investing in a “distinctly investigative, exploratory, hypothesis-driven mindset” is key to achieving process improvement at all levels of the software organization. He sees the value in the iterative approach that so well suits the skills testers bring to a collaboration, and encourages testers to be integral in more aspects of a project than just the black-and-white testing phases.

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The Ins and Outs of Writing an Effective Mobile Bug Report (Part II)

Be sure to check out Part I of Daniel Knott’s articleimages on effective mobile bug reports for further context before continuing on.

Here’s the rest of the information you should plan on including in every bug report.

Network Condition and Environment

When filing a mobile bug, it’s important to provide some information about the network condition and the environment in which the bug occurred. This will help to identify the problem more easily and will possibly show some side effects no one has thought of.

  • Bad: “No information” or “Happened on my way to work”
  • Good: “I was connected to a 3G network while I was walking through the city center.”

Language

If your app supports several languages, provide this information in your bug report.

  • Bad: “No information”
  • Good: “I was using the German language version of the app.”

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The Ins and Outs of Writing an Effective Mobile Bug Report (Part I)

If you find a bug within a mobile app, you need to report it in order to get it fixed. Filing mobile bug reports requires some additional information 250x250xbug_report1-250x250.png.pagespeed.ic_.H3eXAv82fDthat the developers need in order to reproduce and fix the bug.

But what is important when filing a mobile bug? What should a bug report look like? Before I answer those two questions, I want to raise another one: “Why even send a bug report?”

Bug reports are very important for the product owner, product manager and the developers. Firstly, a bug report tells the developers and the product owner about issues they were not aware of. Reports also help identify possible new features no one has thought of, and, last but not least, they provide useful information about how a customer may use the software. All of this information can be used to improve the software.

Whenever you find something strange or if something behaves differently or looks weird, don’t hesitate to file a bug report.

Now onto the question of what a bug should look like and what’s important when filing it. It should contain as much information as possible in order to identify, reproduce and fix the bug. Having said that, your report should only include information that’s important to handling the bug, so try to avoid adding any useless information. Additionally, only describe one error per bug. Don’t combine, group or create containers for bugs. It’s likely that not all of the bugs will be fixed at the same time, so refrain from combining or grouping them.

Here’s the information you should plan on including in every bug report.

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Software Testing Budgets on the Rise, Focused on the ‘New IT’

Software testing and QA budgets keep on going up, and shiny, new toys are all of their focus.3C8D67088BE44F318BC592671BC43

According to a ZDNet report based off of a new survey of 1,543 CIOs, conducted and published by Capgemini and HP, “for the first time, most IT testing and QA dollars are now being spent on new stuff, such as social, mobile, analytics, cloud and the Internet of Things, and less of it on simply modernizing and maintaining legacy systems and applications.”

In fact, this “new IT” is making up 52 percent of the testing budgets, up from 41 percent in 2012. And it’s just part of a trend of rising testing budgets in general, hopefully good news for testers — testing now represents 26 percent of total IT budgets on average, up from 18 percent in 2012, and projected to rise to 29 percent by 2017.

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Latest Testing in the Pub Podcast: Software Testing Hiring and Careers

Testing in the PubIf you weren’t aware, software testing and quality assurance engineers are perennially ranked amongst the happiest jobs, and this was no different in 2014.

It’s thus a good time to be in demand as a software tester with all of that love and happiness awaiting you in your next job. With that, uTest contributor Stephen Janaway’s latest Testing in the Pub podcast takes on the topic of hiring testers, and software testing recruitment. You’ll hear about what test managers need to look out for when recruiting testers, and what testers need to do when seeking out a new role in the testing industry.

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