Meet the uTesters: Iwona Pekala

Iwona Pekala is a gold rated full-time tester on paid projects at uTest, and a uTester for over 3 years. Iwona is also currently serving as a uTest Forums moderator for the second consecutive quarter. She is a fan of computers and technology, and lives in Kraków, Poland.

Be sure to also follow Iwona’s profile on uTest as well so you can stay up to date with her activity in the community!

IwonauTest: Android or iOS?

Iwona: Android. I can customize it in more ways when compared to iOS. Additionally, apps have more abilities, there is a lot of hardware to choose from, and it takes less time to accomplish basic tasks like selecting text or tapping small buttons.

uTest: What drew you into testing initially? What’s kept you at it?

Iwona: I became a tester accidentally. I was looking for a summer internship for computer science students (I was thinking about becoming a programmer). The first offer I got was for the role of tester. I was about to change it, and I was transitioned to a developer role after some time. It was uTest that kept me as a tester, particularly the flexibility of work and variety of projects.

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New uTest Platform Features Emphasize Quality

Last week, uTest launched two new Platform features for uTesters on paid projects which continue to drive the needle in our continuous pursuit of quality (plus a very useful change to existing tester dashboard functionality). Here’s a recap of what is included in the latest uTest Platform release.

Bug Report Integrity

Most testers understand the role of a bug report is to provide information. However, a “good” or valuable bug report takes that a step further and provides useful and actionable information in an efficient way. As such, in addition to approving tester issues, Test Team Leads (TTLs) and Project Managers (PMs) have the ability to rate the integrity of a tester’s bug report by setting the bug report integrity to High, Unrated or Low. However, by default, all bugs will be set to Unrated.

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Meet the uTesters: David Oreol

David Oreol has been a uTester since the very beginning, and is a full-time Test Team Lead Premier and Gold-rated tester on paid projects at uTest. Before juTester-David-Oreol-300x300oining the community, David earned a B.S. in Computer Science from California State University Fresno and worked in IT and as a software engineer.

Be sure to also follow David’s profile on uTest as well so you can stay up to date with his activity in the community!

uTest: Android or iOS?

David: For work, both. I like testing on both environments, but for personal use, it is iOS and Mac all the way. I like the ease of use and integration between the mobile and desktop platforms. I don’t like having to constantly tweak my phone or computer to get it to work. I used to be a die-hard Windows fan, but I switched to Mac a few years ago and haven’t looked back.

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Why Are Testers Uninterested in Upgrading Their Skill Sets?

“The only type of testing that I can do is manual testing.”Distance-Education
“Test automation is very important, but I am too busy now to learn something new.”
“Test automation is useful, but I will learn it when I will need it.”
“I am interested in test automation, but I don’t know any programming and it will take a long time to learn it.”
“I want to learn test automation, but my employer does not have any training programs.”

Have you ever heard any of these stories? I have, and not only once, but many times, about test automation, load testing, and web service testing.

Most of the testers I know say in one way or another that they would like to learn more about their profession but, “not now, maybe later, when the conditions will be better, when they will need the new skills in their job, when their employer will pay for their training, when someone will train them for free, when they will be less busy, etc.” The list goes on.

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Google Test Automation Conference: Video From Days 1 & 2

The Google Test Automation Conference (GTAC) is an annual test automation conference hosted by Google, bringing together engineers to discuss advances in test automation and the test engineering computer science field.

GTAC 2014 was recently held just a few weeks ago at Google’s Kirkland office (Washington State, US), and we’re happy to present video of talks and topics from both days of the conference.

If 15-plus hours of video below just isn’t enough, be sure to also check out all of our Automation courses available at uTest University today.

Testing Tool Showdown: liteCam HD vs. Mobizen

7a9a23a7651f16f378279c983cd8039a_400x400Clear, to-the-point bug reports that are backed up with solid evidence are a must for testers when it comes to communicating with developers and getting to the root cause of issues quickly.

And that evidence comes in the form of attachments, which add to a bug report by offering proof of the bug’s existence, enabling the customer or developer to reproduce and quickly rectify the issue at hand.

But with all of the options out there, we wanted to single out a couple of options that could get testers started, so we took to two popular screen recording tools from our uTest Tool Reviews in liteCam and Mobizen.

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Latest Testing in the Pub Podcast Takes on Testing Weekend Europe

Testing in the PubSteve Janaway and team are back for more pub pints over software testing discussion, in the latest Testing in the Pub podcast.

In Episode 13, UK-based software testers Amy Phillips and Neil Studd talk Weekend Testing Europe. Weekend Testing Europe is the European chapter of Weekend Testing and was just relaunched in 2014 by Amy and Neil.

Weekend Testing is a program that aims to facilitate peer-to-peer learning through monthly Skype testing sessions. If you’ll also recall, uTest contributor Michael Larsen is a founding member of the Americas chapter of the program.

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Join uTest for a #uTestChat Twitter Chat on Friday

This Friday, November 21st, we are excited for you to join @uTest on Twitter for #uTestChat starting at 1:00 p.m. EST. It’s time to huddle around the virtual water cooler and connect with your fellow software testers as we chat about all things software testing.

Have a question about furthering your career or breaking into a new testing type? How to write a great bug report? What’s the best testing tool for the job? Bring your thoughts and opinions, and get ready to spend some time connecting with the testing community. twitter-utest-chat

What is a Twitter chat?

A Twitter chat (or tweet chat) is a live, real-time conversation between a group of people on Twitter. The group follows one hashtag (#uTestChat) and your moderators from the Community Management team (Linda and Ryan) will keep the discussion moving.

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Meet the uTesters: Michael Solomon

Michael Solomon is a Silver-rated tester on paid projects at uTest, hailing from the United States (New York). When he’s not testing softmichael solomonware, Michael works as a freelance sound man in TV. You can visit some of his work over at his website.

Be sure to also follow Michael’s profile on uTest as well so you can stay up to date with his activity in the community!

uTest: Android or iOS?

Michael: iOS! I have had an iPhone since the first one came out, and I think I have owned every model since the very first one. I do have a Samsung Galaxy S4 for testing purposes. While the Android platform has become easier for me to understand, I most definitely prefer iOS and its abilities to sync seamlessly with my Macbook Air, Calendars, iMessage, etc.

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Selenium: 10 Years Later and Still Going Strong

In the field of testing technologies, it isn’t very often that we see a tool survive and grow richer in over a decade. Just recently, Selenium completed 10 years, and this article takes a look at the ecosystem that Selenium has nurtured.tw-blog-promo-tile-120x120

Agile and Selenium

The agile manifesto has been around longer than Selenium, and more teams are looking towards the agile form of software development to reduce their feedback cycles and practice continuous delivery. One of the practices that teams need to do well when working the agile way, is test automation.

Test automation may seem easy — but in order for it to be truly effective, the team needs to have a lot of discipline in defining their process, choosing the right tools and technologies to give that quick feedback by running various types of tests (smoke, regression, etc.), and also allow the test automation to evolve and scale.

That said, even today, completing test automation in the same iteration along with development is a huge challenge for most teams. These challenges get aggravated and more apparent when test automation uses tools and technologies that are difficult to keep in sync with the rapidly changing product.

It was 2004 when Jason Huggins, while testing an internal application at ThoughtWorks, created a JavaScriptTestRunner that changed the way automating the browser (browser-based-testing) is done. This then evolved into “Selenium” which was subsequently made open source.

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