New Testing Tool Tutorials at uTest University

There are plenty of options when it comes to choosing your suite of testing tools. Some tools may excel at one specific task, while others perform at an average level for more than one testing task.

A few months ago, we launched the Tool Reviews section of our site to let members of the uTest community rate and review the best testing tools. The community has responded by easily singling out the most popular and highest rated testing tools. logos

Over at uTest University, we’ve recently published new tutorials for some of the most requested tools in order to help testers set up these tools to use for testing. These tutorials are designed to be quick, easy to follow, and to get you up-and-running in no time.

Check My Links is a browser extension developed primarily for web designers, developers and content editors. The extension quickly finds all the links on a web page, and checks each one for you. It highlights which ones are valid and which ones are broken. You can learn how to set up and use Check My Links for testing using this new tutorial.

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Four Reasons Software Testing Will Move Even Further Into the Wild by 2017

apple0132Ever since our inception, uTest and our colleagues within Applause have always been a huge proponent of what we like to call ‘In-the-Wild’ Testing.

Our community is made up of 150,000+ testers in 200 countries around the world, the largest of its kind, and our testers have already stretched the definition of what testing ‘in the wild’ can be, by testing countless customers’ apps on their own devices where they live, work and play.

That ‘play’ part of In-the-Wild testing is primed to take up a much larger slice of testers’ time. While we have already seen a taste of it with emerging technologies gradually being introduced into the mobile app mix, there are four major players primed to go mainstream in just a couple of short years. That means you can expect testers to be spending less time pushing buttons testing on mobile apps in their homes and offices…and more time ‘testing’ by jogging and buying socks. Here’s why.

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Authors in Testing Q&A: Dorothy Graham Talks ‘Experiences of Test Automation’

Dorothy (Dot) Graham has been in software testing for 40 years, and is co-author of four books, including two on test automation (with Mark DG-photoFewster).

She was programme chair for EuroSTAR twice and is a popular speaker at international conferences. Dot has been on the boards of publications, conferences and qualifications in software testing. She was awarded the European Excellence Award in Software Testing in 1999 and the first ISTQB Excellence Award in 2012. You can visit her at her website.

In this Q&A, uTest spoke with Dot about her experiences in automation, its misconceptions, and some of her favorite stories from her most recent book which she co-authored, ‘Experiences of Test Automation: Case Studies of Software Test Automation.’ Stay tuned at the end of the interview for chapter excerpt previews of the book, along with an exclusive discount code to purchase.

uTest: Could you tell us a little more about the path that brought you to automation?

Dorothy Graham: That’s easy – by accident! My first job was at Bell Labs and I was hired as a programmer (my degrees were in Maths, there weren’t many computer courses back in the 1970s). I was put into a testing team for a system that processed signals from hydrophones, and my job was to write test execution and comparison utilities (as they were called then, not tools).

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Latest Testing in the Pub Podcast: Part II of Software Testing Hiring and Careers

Testing in the PubThe latest Testing in the Pub podcast continues the discussion on what test managers need to look out for when recruiting testers, and what testers need to do when seeking out a new role in the testing industry.

There’s a lot of practical advice in this edition served over pints at the pub — from the perfect resume/CV length (one page is too short!) to a very candid discussion on questions that are pointless when gauging whether someone is the right fit for your testing team.

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Open Source Load Testing Tools Comparison: Which One Should You Use?

This piece was originally published by our good friends at BlazeMeter – the Load Testing Cloud. Don’t forget to also check out all of the load testing tool options out there — and other testing tools — along with user-submitted reviews at our Tool Reviews section of the site.

Is your application, server or service is fast enough? How do you know? Can you be 100% sure that your latest feature hasn’t triggered a performance degradation or memory JMeter-Response-Times-vs-Threadsleak?

The only way to be sure is by regularly checking the performance of your web or app. But which tool should you use for this?

In this article, I’m going to review the pros and cons of the most popular open source solutions for load and performance testing.

Chances are that most of you have already seen this page. It’s a great list of 53 of the most commonly used open source performance testing tools.  However, some of these tools are limited to only HTTP protocol, some haven’t been updated for years and most aren’t flexible enough to provide parametrization, correlation, assertions and distributed testing capabilities.

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Testing the Limits With Testing ‘Rock Star’ Michael Larsen — Part I

Michael Larsen is a software tester based out of San Francisco. Including a picture-87071-1360261260decade at Cisco in testing, he’s also has an extremely varied rock star career (quite literally…more on that later) touching upon several industries and technologies including virtual machine software and video game development.

Michael is a member of the Board of Directors for the Association for Software Testing and a founding member of the “Americas” Chapter of “Weekend Testing.” He also blogs at TESTHEAD and can be reached on Twitter at @mkltesthead.

In Part I of our two-part Testing the Limits interview, we talk with Michael on the most rewarding parts of his career, and how most testers are unaware of a major “movement” around them.

uTest: This is your first time on Testing the Limits. Could you tell our testers a little bit about your path into testing?

Michael Larsen: My path to testing was pure serendipity. I initially had plans to become a rock star in my younger years. I sang with several San Francisco Bay Area bands during the mid-to-late 80s and early 90s. Not the most financially stable life, to say the least. While I was trying to keep my head above water, I went to a temp agency and asked if they could help me get a more stable “day job.” They sent me to Cisco Systems in 1991, right at the time that they were gearing up to launch for the stratosphere.

I was assigned to the Release Engineering group to help them with whatever I could, and in the process, I learned how to burn EEPROMs, run network cables, wire up and configure machines, and I became a lab administrator for the group. Since I had developed a god rapport with the team, I was hired full-time and worked as their lab administrator. I came to realize that Release Engineering was the software test team for Cisco, and over the next couple of years, they encouraged me to join their testing team. The rest, as they say, is history.

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Mad Scientists Welcome at the STARWEST 2014 Test Lab

Testing is dull, boring, and repetitive.

Ever heard anyone say that? Well at STARWEST 2014, the theme is Breaking Software (in the spirit of Breaking Bad), and this crowd is anything but dull! Creativity abounds at this conference, from the whimsical (yet impactful) session topics to the geek-chic booth themes (I do so love a good Star Wars parody!) to the on-site Test Lab run by what at first glance appears to be a crew of mad scientists. Boring or repetitive? I don’t think so!

Because the Test Lab was such a fun space, I interviewed one of the mad scientist/test lab rats, Paul Carvalho, to get the lowdown on what STARWEST 2014 attendees have been up to. Check out the video below for a tour of the STARWEST Test Lab, complete with singing computers, noisy chickens, talking clocks, and more!

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STARWEST 2014 Interview: Mind Over Pixels — Quality Starts With the Right Attitude

How important is a tester’s mindset and attitude when it comes to testing?

I sat down with Stephen Vance, one of the STARWEST 2014 speakers, to chat about just that. As an Agile/Lean coach, Stephen is passionate about helping testers understand how to communicate with developers to better integrate into the software development process, and it all starts with the attitude you bring to the table.

Stephen teaches that investing in a “distinctly investigative, exploratory, hypothesis-driven mindset” is key to achieving process improvement at all levels of the software organization. He sees the value in the iterative approach that so well suits the skills testers bring to a collaboration, and encourages testers to be integral in more aspects of a project than just the black-and-white testing phases.

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Top Tweets from STARWEST 2014

If you haven’t stopped by and seen us at the ol’ uTest booth, now’s the time! CM’s own Sue Brown is at the show along with the Applause crew.

But if you’re not there, have no fear, as Sue will be reporting back with some video interviews with testers and her own thoughts on the show here on the uTest Blog. In the meantime, we have selected some of our favorite tweets from STARWEST as the tail-end of the show is in full swing:

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Dynamic Testing According to ISO 29119 the Subject of Software Testing Book Excerpt

As testers, you know that software testing is a critical aspect of the software development process. A new book aims to offer a practi804Hasscal understanding of all the most critical software testing topics and their relationships and interdependencies.

The Guide to Advanced Software Testing (second edition) by Anne Mette Hass, published by Artech House, offers a clear overview of software testing, from the definition of testing and the value and purpose of testing, through the complete testing process with all its activities, techniques and documentation, to the softer aspects of people and teams working with testing.

Practitioners will find numerous examples and exercises presented in each chapter to help ensure a complete understanding of the material. The book supports the ISTQB certification and provides a bridge from this to the ISO 29119 software testing standard in terms of extensive mappings between the two.

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