Latest Testing in the Pub Podcast: Part II of Software Testing Hiring and Careers

Testing in the PubThe latest Testing in the Pub podcast continues the discussion on what test managers need to look out for when recruiting testers, and what testers need to do when seeking out a new role in the testing industry.

There’s a lot of practical advice in this edition served over pints at the pub — from the perfect resume/CV length (one page is too short!) to a very candid discussion on questions that are pointless when gauging whether someone is the right fit for your testing team.

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Open Source Load Testing Tools Comparison: Which One Should You Use?

This piece was originally published by our good friends at BlazeMeter – the Load Testing Cloud. Don’t forget to also check out all of the load testing tool options out there — and other testing tools — along with user-submitted reviews at our Tool Reviews section of the site.

Is your application, server or service is fast enough? How do you know? Can you be 100% sure that your latest feature hasn’t triggered a performance degradation or memory JMeter-Response-Times-vs-Threadsleak?

The only way to be sure is by regularly checking the performance of your web or app. But which tool should you use for this?

In this article, I’m going to review the pros and cons of the most popular open source solutions for load and performance testing.

Chances are that most of you have already seen this page. It’s a great list of 53 of the most commonly used open source performance testing tools.  However, some of these tools are limited to only HTTP protocol, some haven’t been updated for years and most aren’t flexible enough to provide parametrization, correlation, assertions and distributed testing capabilities.

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Testing the Limits With Testing ‘Rock Star’ Michael Larsen — Part I

Michael Larsen is a software tester based out of San Francisco. Including a picture-87071-1360261260decade at Cisco in testing, he’s also has an extremely varied rock star career (quite literally…more on that later) touching upon several industries and technologies including virtual machine software and video game development.

Michael is a member of the Board of Directors for the Association for Software Testing and a founding member of the “Americas” Chapter of “Weekend Testing.” He also blogs at TESTHEAD and can be reached on Twitter at @mkltesthead.

In Part I of our two-part Testing the Limits interview, we talk with Michael on the most rewarding parts of his career, and how most testers are unaware of a major “movement” around them.

uTest: This is your first time on Testing the Limits. Could you tell our testers a little bit about your path into testing?

Michael Larsen: My path to testing was pure serendipity. I initially had plans to become a rock star in my younger years. I sang with several San Francisco Bay Area bands during the mid-to-late 80s and early 90s. Not the most financially stable life, to say the least. While I was trying to keep my head above water, I went to a temp agency and asked if they could help me get a more stable “day job.” They sent me to Cisco Systems in 1991, right at the time that they were gearing up to launch for the stratosphere.

I was assigned to the Release Engineering group to help them with whatever I could, and in the process, I learned how to burn EEPROMs, run network cables, wire up and configure machines, and I became a lab administrator for the group. Since I had developed a god rapport with the team, I was hired full-time and worked as their lab administrator. I came to realize that Release Engineering was the software test team for Cisco, and over the next couple of years, they encouraged me to join their testing team. The rest, as they say, is history.

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Mad Scientists Welcome at the STARWEST 2014 Test Lab

Testing is dull, boring, and repetitive.

Ever heard anyone say that? Well at STARWEST 2014, the theme is Breaking Software (in the spirit of Breaking Bad), and this crowd is anything but dull! Creativity abounds at this conference, from the whimsical (yet impactful) session topics to the geek-chic booth themes (I do so love a good Star Wars parody!) to the on-site Test Lab run by what at first glance appears to be a crew of mad scientists. Boring or repetitive? I don’t think so!

Because the Test Lab was such a fun space, I interviewed one of the mad scientist/test lab rats, Paul Carvalho, to get the lowdown on what STARWEST 2014 attendees have been up to. Check out the video below for a tour of the STARWEST Test Lab, complete with singing computers, noisy chickens, talking clocks, and more!

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STARWEST 2014 Interview: Mind Over Pixels — Quality Starts With the Right Attitude

How important is a tester’s mindset and attitude when it comes to testing?

I sat down with Stephen Vance, one of the STARWEST 2014 speakers, to chat about just that. As an Agile/Lean coach, Stephen is passionate about helping testers understand how to communicate with developers to better integrate into the software development process, and it all starts with the attitude you bring to the table.

Stephen teaches that investing in a “distinctly investigative, exploratory, hypothesis-driven mindset” is key to achieving process improvement at all levels of the software organization. He sees the value in the iterative approach that so well suits the skills testers bring to a collaboration, and encourages testers to be integral in more aspects of a project than just the black-and-white testing phases.

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Top Tweets from STARWEST 2014

If you haven’t stopped by and seen us at the ol’ uTest booth, now’s the time! CM’s own Sue Brown is at the show along with the Applause crew.

But if you’re not there, have no fear, as Sue will be reporting back with some video interviews with testers and her own thoughts on the show here on the uTest Blog. In the meantime, we have selected some of our favorite tweets from STARWEST as the tail-end of the show is in full swing:

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Dynamic Testing According to ISO 29119 the Subject of Software Testing Book Excerpt

As testers, you know that software testing is a critical aspect of the software development process. A new book aims to offer a practi804Hasscal understanding of all the most critical software testing topics and their relationships and interdependencies.

The Guide to Advanced Software Testing (second edition) by Anne Mette Hass, published by Artech House, offers a clear overview of software testing, from the definition of testing and the value and purpose of testing, through the complete testing process with all its activities, techniques and documentation, to the softer aspects of people and teams working with testing.

Practitioners will find numerous examples and exercises presented in each chapter to help ensure a complete understanding of the material. The book supports the ISTQB certification and provides a bridge from this to the ISO 29119 software testing standard in terms of extensive mappings between the two.

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The Ins and Outs of Writing an Effective Mobile Bug Report (Part II)

Be sure to check out Part I of Daniel Knott’s articleimages on effective mobile bug reports for further context before continuing on.

Here’s the rest of the information you should plan on including in every bug report.

Network Condition and Environment

When filing a mobile bug, it’s important to provide some information about the network condition and the environment in which the bug occurred. This will help to identify the problem more easily and will possibly show some side effects no one has thought of.

  • Bad: “No information” or “Happened on my way to work”
  • Good: “I was connected to a 3G network while I was walking through the city center.”

Language

If your app supports several languages, provide this information in your bug report.

  • Bad: “No information”
  • Good: “I was using the German language version of the app.”

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The Ins and Outs of Writing an Effective Mobile Bug Report (Part I)

If you find a bug within a mobile app, you need to report it in order to get it fixed. Filing mobile bug reports requires some additional information 250x250xbug_report1-250x250.png.pagespeed.ic_.H3eXAv82fDthat the developers need in order to reproduce and fix the bug.

But what is important when filing a mobile bug? What should a bug report look like? Before I answer those two questions, I want to raise another one: “Why even send a bug report?”

Bug reports are very important for the product owner, product manager and the developers. Firstly, a bug report tells the developers and the product owner about issues they were not aware of. Reports also help identify possible new features no one has thought of, and, last but not least, they provide useful information about how a customer may use the software. All of this information can be used to improve the software.

Whenever you find something strange or if something behaves differently or looks weird, don’t hesitate to file a bug report.

Now onto the question of what a bug should look like and what’s important when filing it. It should contain as much information as possible in order to identify, reproduce and fix the bug. Having said that, your report should only include information that’s important to handling the bug, so try to avoid adding any useless information. Additionally, only describe one error per bug. Don’t combine, group or create containers for bugs. It’s likely that not all of the bugs will be fixed at the same time, so refrain from combining or grouping them.

Here’s the information you should plan on including in every bug report.

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My Weekend with the Goat Simulator App

We often talk about the newest and hottest mobile apps at the uTest Community Management desk. Recently, I was curious if I was missing out on any top apps that I didn’t already have on my Samsung Galaxy S4. I am surrounded by a sea of iPhone users so I am used to not getting in on the latest apps until (much, much) later. Of course, I have the requisite social media, weather, and news apps installed but what is really hot for the Android app market these days? I checked out the top paid apps in the Google Play store and, to my surprise, the one odd app that stuck out is the Goat Simulator at #9 on the Top 10 list. Screenshot_2014-10-10-19-10-05

Per the app’s description: “Gameplay-wise, Goat Simulator is all about causing as much destruction as you possibly can as a goat. It has been compared to an old-school skating game, except instead of being a skater, you’re a goat, and instead of doing tricks, you wreck stuff. When it comes to goats, not even the sky is the limit, as you can probably just bug through it and crash the game. Disclaimer: Goat Simulator is a completely stupid game and, to be honest, you should probably spend your money on something else, such as a hula hoop, a pile of bricks, or maybe pool your money together with your friends and buy a real goat.”Continue Reading